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was shot and killed in his kandahar home today. a killer a bodyguard who taliban officials say they hired to infiltrate karzai's inner circle. this comes as a blow to the government just days after a visit from u.s. defense secretary leon panetta. we're joined by william cohen. thank you for being with us. >> good to be with you. >> let me ask you about this assassination. some have said this will be a huge propaganda victory for the taliban. do youee? >> anytime they can get that close to the inner circle of president karzai it's a big victory for them. it points out the difficulty that president karzai has had in trying to cope with the local politics as such where all frequently invoking tip o'neill's axiom that all politics is local. we're seeing that all politics are local in afghanistan. that's one of the problems that president karzai has. secondly his brother has a reputation of being a power broker. most of our military leaders have said there's not a military solution in afghanistan it's a political one. it makes it that much more difficult. i think it's going to be more challen
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coalition soldiers and the taliban will move on foot. the coalition has helicopters, but then they are back to walking around on foot. this is a lot less useful and they are optimized for -- in places like this you see more small arms fire, lots of snipers. this looks like a street battle in world war two, on a smaller scale. people throwing grenades and things like this. on the coalition side, there is a great air po
right now to go ahead and get the kids out of the room, but this is a video released by taliban insurgents in pakistan and it shows more than a dozen men believed to be pakistani policemen lined up. there they are, against the backdrop of the hillside with their hands tied behind their backs facing several men with rifles on the right side of your screen. this man shouting is accusing them of killing children in a crime against islam. and there they are, the men opening fire. now we froze the video right there because if you continue to watch, it gets even more graphic, even more brutal from that point on. c nrks nr cnn's reza sayah is taking up from here. >> reporter: we warn you, this is explicit video, some of you may find this very disturbing, if you want to turn away, this is a good time to do so. we want to walk you through the video, it shows at least 14 men lined up, all of them wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them appear to have their hands tied behind their back. we assume these are taliban fighters, one of them is scolding the man who are lined up, saying t
released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort too make sure they're dead. the military believes the men who were killed were police officers kidnapped du
it is the taliban has the totally different vision of what is going on. they may have in mind save whatever you like mr. president. we are here and we will be here long after you leave. >> you took my next question and have already begun to answer it. let's take it all the way. if there was a central message to be taken out of vietnam, that surely was it. they were on home turf and had nowhere to go if there is a comparison to be drawn sometimes there are strategic reasons to be in afghanistan which don't or did not apply to be a non but focusing on the one central issue maybe he would follow up whenever incomplete answer that he gives. [laughter] there are analogies it definitely and if you look at what is going on like my father said in the first meeting that he is foreign policy team mike foster, not my father. [laughter] thank you. >> can i be your:father? [laughter] talking about afghanistan is not vietnam i think it has always been there with what is a comparison but yet you could say here is a reason that the u.s. went into afghanistan that is different from those reasons and there's a lot of
of money. >>> in the line of fire. cnn is embedded with u.s. troops in afghanistan when the taliban attack. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in the situation room. a special gathering to tackle america's serious economic problems. key figures from government, business and academia came together this week in chicago for the clinton global might be difference america conference. the event was the brainchild of former president bill clinton. i sat down with him in chicago for a candid interview on the country's debt crisis, the 2012 presidential race, and much more. >> mr. president, thanks very much for joining us. good to be here. first time you've done this as far as the u.s. economy is concerned. normally it's global issues. and i want to get to that, but let's talk about some of the big issues right now. jobs, jobs, jobs. it's a crisis, a game of chicken going on in washington right now between the president, the did democrats on one side, republican leadership on the other side. how big of a deal is this august 2nd deadli
of the taliban coming back into the political system. ahmed rashid details the negotiatings that have been taking place between the united states and the taliban. for hours and hours the germans were intermediaries. nothing seems to have come of it. why is it proving so difficult to, in some way, bring the taliban into the tent? >> for a couple of things, i'd say about that, without commenting on the specifics of the piece in the "financial times" that you referenced. at the end of the day, this will have to be settled in a political settlement. i think that's clear. why is it hard? there's been a conflict there for a nufb years. the taliban is not an entity where it works at a specific address. you have to get these things to a point where you can have a set of reasonable conversations. what we've said, though, quite clearly and secretary of state said this in her speech earlier this year, the united states is prepared to work with the afghans, with the afghans in the lead to work towards a political settlement here and to bring the parties to the table without precondition. ultimately as the pr
when negotiations with the taliban move forward and it also may have very big repercussions for the u.s. effort in the south. people called president hamid karzai's brother a corrupt gangster. but the cia's former head of counterterrorism says the u.s. may miss him. >> it's quite like live that what follows is going to be something that will not work to our interest. >> reporter: an afghan official says he was gunned down in his own home, shot in the head and chest by his own guard. the taliban took credit, but it's not clear if the shooter was really working for them. >> the united states condemns in the strongest possible terms the murder of president karzai's half brother in kandahar. >> a u.s. official said quote, while we must deal with ahm ahmed wali karzai, he's widely understood to be corrupt and narcotics trafficker. the state department and u.s. military were trying to build trust in the afghan government. they frequently criticized ahmed wali, but the cia worked with him. >> i think often parts of the u.s. government were working at cross purposes where ahmed wali was conce
compound. it's the third taliban attack on an afghan powerbroker in the south in more than two weeks. the new u.s. ambassador to afghanistan ryan crocker said it's proof the taliban is so damaged, it can't carry out large-scale operations. he spoke today in kabul. >> they've had to kind of regroup and figure out what they can do and, in some cases, that has been assassination. we saw a very similar pattern in iraq. clearly, these are horrific attacks but they can also be interpreted as a sign of significant organizational weakness. >> sreenivasan: a taliban spokesman told the associated press the kandahar mayor was targeted for ordering the destruction of homes city officials claimed were illegally constructed. two children were killed during that demolition. the prime minister of norway today announced an independent commission will review how last week's twin attacks were allowed to happen. and more details emerged about the self-confessed killer, who is in police custody. we have a report from carl dinnen of "independent television news." >> reporter: by the side of the lake, a sh
rocket projectile, that results in the american troops and have given long-range rockets to taliban in afghanistan and increasing the insurgents' ability to hit u.s. and coalition positions from a safer position." in june, 14 u.s. service members were killed in combat in iraq and officials attribute the death to militias trained by the iran revolutionary guard. senator, what do we do about iran? >> well, i think people need to understand why iran is doing this. the biggest nightmare for the ayatollah in iran is to have a democracy in iraq and afghanistan on their borders. so, yes, they are helping the taliban and trying to react to bring down the iraqi democracy and trying to undermine the efforts here. they're responsible for material coming in both countrys killing not only the american soldiers but the iraqi and afghan people. they are helping assad in syria. i hope people understand what iran is up to. their biggest nightmare is that the arab spring is successful, that we can pull off iraq and afghanistan in terms of representative democracy. they are going to fight to the bitte
hawkish opinion the so-called gang of three from washington said the taliban would never seriously negotiate peace with the u.s. >> the planned drawdown is an unnecessary risk. i hope and pray every night that the drawdown will still allow us to succeed. i have very little doubt if we are deprived in a significant degree to the fighting season which was planned for eastern began stn. >> s senator mccain told me he would be two steps forward one step back for many years to come. general david petraeus leaves this fabled graveyard filled with america's own sacrifices but with a new mission to minimize further losses here and prevent threats back on home soil. dominique denatali fox news. >> senior officials believe iran transferred new weapons to allies from iraq to allies. the revolutionary guard has given the taliban long range rockets and sent them exploding projectiles to iraq. it considers them american propaganda. a boat packed with refugees bound for saudi arabia sank off the coast of the sudan. it is clear 200 people died. three migrants have been rescued. >> venezuela presid
rough. the coalition troops and the taliban moved on foot. the coalition also has helicopters that can get them between mountain tops. they would be back to walking around on foot. these are law that useful. -- a lot less useful. they are used for blowing up vehicles. in some places, you see more small arms. this sort of looks like a world war ii street battle on a smaller scale. guys running around with rifles and tossing grenades, things like that. on the coalition side, there is a significant air power aspect of it as well. the tactical security threats to nato troops. >> this is located in the far most peace which is a ride along the border. this is a critical area for cross border infiltration as well as a historic avenue and the movement of supplies. >> in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how would you characterize this? >> i would characterize this as high as venture. there is a significant influx of insurgent fighters to the area. >> we are prepared to go on a mission, tell me about that and what it is for. >> this is a standard reconnaissance mission. we're going in there to
explosives and cargo planes bound for the united states. it was the taliban and pakistan s sent a man on a failed attempt to blow up an suv in times square. it is a al qaeda is in here adherents,individuals, sometimes with little or no physical contact to al qaeda had succumbed to its hateful ideology and have a engaged in or facilitated terrorist activities in the united states. these misguided individuals are spurred on by the likes of -- -- we have seen the tragic results of that military murder and the attack in fort hood did this is the first counterterrorism strategy that focuses on the ability of rocket and its networks to inspire people to attack us -- of al qaeda and its networks to inspire people to attack us from within. president obama have made it a priority to renew american leadership in the world, strengthening our alliances, deepening partnerships. al qaeda seeks to make america look like an enemy to the world's most and -- world's muslim. al qaeda 6 to bleed as financially by dryness into a long drawn-out wars that inflame -- seeks to lead us financially by driving u
a special personal interest in defeating the taliban. and afghanistan as a whole had seen how evil the taliban was. how much damage they could do to society as they burned paintings and books and films and totally suppressed freedom in afghanistan. they knew. these people were evil but they were afraid of them but with the united states weaponry, with our guidance and intelligence training these people defeated the taliban. what i was not aware of until we met with these folks and turns out i could have been aware, i just was not, but do you the research, you find out, the bush administration convinced the northern alliance, ok, now that you've whipped the taliban you need to totally disarm. because we're the united states and we're here and we'll make sure nothing happens to you again. well, the northern alliance messed up because they trusted us and they turned in their weapons, i asked one, you turned in all your weapons? well, apparently they have some small arms, but nothing that would allow them to take on the taliban again. naturally these people were concerned because they
pakistan's failure to act against militant extremists like the network in the north, the afghan taliban and other militant extremists. we will be interested in hearing general dempsey's thoughts on how to get the pakistan military to go after terrorist groups finding sanctuary in pakistan's tribal regions. al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen and al qaeda elements in somalia continue to take advantage of failing and failed states to train their operatives and to plan attacks against the united states and our interests. it is critical that we don't apply significant pressure to these terrorist organizations, and to work with governments and international organizations in the region to address the long term problems. iran remains probably the greatest risk to world peace and to regional stability. we share the concerns of many nations about iran's continued support of terrorist activities beyond its borders, development of its missile programs, and refusal to cooperate with the international atomic energy commission. while we've seen evidence that the international sanctions has pu
against the taliban. they describe him as a long-time trusted guard for president karzai and his half brother. his half brother was shot and killed in the southern city of kandahar. the taliban claimed the shooter was asleeper agent. >>> 45 minutes past the hour. thousands of protesters continue their week-long sit-ins across the tahrir square. protesters are there now with the goal of seating a civilian presidential council to rule egypt during the transitional period. >>> and then a massive volcanic erupti eruption. the first eruption was last night followed by a second one this morning. the disaster management teams have been dispatched to the area to assess the damage. >>> an event more in the decade in the making. harry potter fans packed into theaters on thursday to behold the final battle between the hero and the dark lord. ha this latest film caps the end of what has captured a generation of more than 12 years. >>> and how about never-before-seen footage? now your interested. join larry king for a cnn special "harry potter, the final chapter," airs right here on cnn. >>> he's
karzi buried his brother, wali karzai. he was killed by his long-time bodyguard. the taliban claim the shooter was working for them. and the u.n. is reported that the number of afghan civilians killed in the war soared up to 15% in the first half of the year. 1400 civilians were killed in fighting between american and nato forces and the taliban and other militants. >>> in india, more details today in the bombings of the financial capital of mumbai. government officials say they had no warning of the explosions. nobody claimed responsibility for the attacks. the government has been careful not to point the finger at the pakistani militants who were responsible for the 2008 attacks. those who carried out the latest attacks worked in a very clan dau stein manner. >>> and then south sudan today became the newest member of the united nations. the former southern half of awe africa's largest nation celebrated independence on saturday in a ceremony attended by world leaders, but a lot of hard work does remain. south sudan is one of the poorest countries and least developed, and much reac
the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's northwest in tribal areas. he also admits there was some skepticism about what help they are getting from pakistan after they killed osama bin laden last month. he did say that in the past pakistan has helped them track down some of the al-qaeda leadership. >> heather: thank you very much, david piper streaming live from afghanistan. >> gregg: are we really in reach of defeating al-qaeda? is the road to victory as simply as taking out the top 20 leaders. joining me now is senior advisor and principal of international advis
two weeks. the taliban has claimed responsibility for all three attacks. >>> libyan rebels received a diplomatic boost today with recognition from great britain. the conflict there in libya has gone under the public's radar recently because of more pressing economic concerns here in washington. but national cute correspondent jennifer griffin tells us -- national security correspondent jennifer griffin tells the nato mission is still unaccomplished. >> this is a video broadcast on libya state television tuesday of the pan am lockerbie bomber rallying support for libyan leader muammar qaddafi in downtown tripoli. the lockerbie bomber was released on compassionate grounds by a scottish judge two years ago, because he was reportedly dying of cancer. but he's still standing, as is muammar qaddafi, five months after the start of an operation the white house said would be brief. >> i said at the outset, this was going to be a matter of days and not weeks. >> it's no longer costly american tomahawk missiles being used to protect the libyans from the dictator, but the cost for the mission c
not the end of the taliban. you're looking at core group of individuals founded al qaeda and running it over the years. that may be on the brink of collapse but let's not say this movement is near its end. jon: so a little bit like turning the lights and cockroaches scatter? you may kill them off in places like afghanistan but they are over in the other places, somalia and arabian peninsula? >> that's right. actually this is a testament to bin laden's plan for the al qaeda network. he created a more diffuse network after the united states began to crack down on al qaeda in late 1990s. you saw rise of al qaeda in north africa and al shaback in east africa. al qaeda in iraq done great damage to u.s. forces. the taliban was once a government but relegated to affiliate movement of al qaeda. what you have a is number of organizations sort of franchises of al qaeda that continue to grow and thrive while we have focused in on the core as we called it. now i think after the death of bin laden in early may, i think we were able to get a lot of intelligence. we've gone after a lot of the other high-le
. >> general, chuck hoss kinson from politico. you said before that with the problem of infiltration of taliban into afghan security forces, as the afghans take over more and more responsibility that there might be a need to accept a greater risk in terms of dealing with that problem. how would you assess the possibility of that risk going forward now and what steps would you be taking to mitigate it? >> the mitigation of that risk is being done by a combination of counterintelligence effort, by the coalition forces and most importantly the afghan national security forces are taking it head on. it's an issue of leadership and knowing your people and the afghan leadership and chain of command is taking that on and i believe we're moving in the right direction with that risk. >> i want to thing che -- change the subject real quick work the upcoming transition in the army, i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about your interactions with general odeer noah and your thoughts on his leadership for the army going forward. >> i've had just one interact with general odierno at a utility confe
, the taliban come back will there be a historical judgment that because of whatever reading of history he made that he will be considered the president that lost afgnistan? >> that's a really good question because the last chapter of the book, chapter 10, is called "good enough." and what they're hoping for is something they can term "good enough." that it will not be termed a loss. that it may not be a full-fledged victory. it m not be something that they can proclaim that everhing is wonrful in afghanistan w. but something they can say is good enough. they can get out at whatever point they do that, not having to say they lost. so that is definite play the people that talked to said that they'r hoping for and that's the last chapter of the book. >> rose: someone who had a personal experience with vietnam never wanted to put boots on the ground. >> never. he would do anything... he'd be a great hero bombing from 30,000 feet but don't put boots on the ground. that was his fundamental problem at that time. >> rose: well, and that's also the point of view of barack obama about libya, for exampl
was announcing to the taliban the day you were going to withdraw. while they might not have watches, they do have calendars. it makes it difficult to negotiate with someone or to drive them away if they know that only have to hide for a certain time and then can come back because you are gone. i think that was a mistake. i think it was a mistake not to oversee the elections, the government elections, to make sure they were held in a way that had public confidence in a government that was not corrupt. i think there are some lessons learned. we have been there 10 years. it is time for the afghan people to take responsibility for preserving the independence which has been fought for so valiantly by our soldiers. our men and women have made extraordinary sacrifices there, and other places in the history of this great nation. we want to see the afghans pick up the responsibility for the effort that goes forward. the determination of when to pull our troops out should come with the input of the generals and the leaders on the ground. i think the president should listen more to them, as david cameron di
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)